Educational Effectiveness

The three-year moving average graduation rate at EDS is currently above 85%.

The average placement rate of 2011 and 2012 graduates is so far 81% and rising.

Assessment instruments include a final year Integration Paper, articulating a student’s Theology of Ministry, and various measurements specific to the various degree programs.

Graduation Rates*

Entering Class Fall 2005- Spring 2006

Graduation Rate (within 150% time)

 Entered Graduated Graduation Rate %
  8 DMin  6    75%
 14 MDiv 12   86%
 4 MATS 3  75%
 Overall Total    81%

Entering Class Summer 2006- Spring 2007

Graduation Rate (within 150% time) 

Entered Graduated Graduation Rate %
2 DMin 2 100%
13 MDiv 11 85%
4 MATS 4 100%
Overall Total    89%

Entering Class Summer 2007- Spring 2008

Graduation Rate (within 150% time)

Entered Graduated Graduation Rate %
11 DMin 10 91%
20 MDiv 17 85%
5 MATS 4 80%
Overall Total   86%

Entering Class Summer 2008 - Spring 2009

Graduation Rate (within 150% time)

Entered Graduated Graduation Rate %
3 DMin 2 67%
21 MDiv 16 76%
5 MATS 4 80%
Overall Total   76%

Entering Class Summer 2009-Spring 2010

Graduation Rate (within 150% time)

Entered Graduated Graduation Rate %
2 DMin 1 50%
26 MDiv 20 77%
3 MATS 3 100%
Overall Total  

74%

Placement Rates 

2011   18 of 22 graduates =82%

2012   22 of 28 graduates =79% 

2013   20 of 27 graduates =74%

2014   18 of 23 graduates =78% 

*Based on completion within 150% standard program time, these rates do not yet include students having graduated from Distributive Learning MATS and MDIV programs introduced in 2007, which are four and five-year programs respectively. Relevant data will become available in 2014. For data updates, please contact the Registrar.

Statement of Educational Effectiveness

The faculty has developed the program goals each of the degree programs offered by the school. The faculty and staff are committed to helping students to achieve these goals and to rigorous evaluation of student learning outcomes, programs, and services. Each year the faculty develops direct and indirect measurements for educational effectiveness in order to improve the quality of education.

Master of Divinity

At EDS we expect that graduates with an MDiv degree should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of Christian texts, the development of doctrines, and religious institutions and movements.
  2. Possess knowledge of the subject matter of the canonical areas required by the Episcopal Church: Bible, Church History, Liturgy, Theology, Ethics, Theory and Practice of Ministry, and Studies in Contemporary Society.
  3. Understand Christianity and other religious traditions as historically-situated movements interacting with its environment and changing over time.
  4. Possess knowledge of and can facilitate discussions on embodied categories such as race, gender, class, sexuality, and ability.
  5. Reflect a clear sense of vocation and have been formed in spiritual and ministerial dimensions.
  6. Demonstrate integrity in terms of professional identity: professional ethics, stewardship of resources, self-care, holy habits, a balance of body, mind, and spirit, and recognition of appropriate boundaries.
  7. Possess a fully developed sense of mission and are agents for transformation and change, with awareness of social and political issues.
  8. Demonstrate competence in leadership in liturgy and the arts of ministry, word and sacrament, both in church and in other worship settings, including public contexts.
  9. Develop competence in communication and teaching skills.
  10. Understand their role as public leaders and possess collaborative and political skills in navigating and strategizing regarding institutions.

Direct measures of learning (2013-14) revealed that 73% of students exceeded the faculty’s standards for the degree program goals, 18% met expectations, and 9% needed improvement in one or more areas. 

Indirect measures of learning (2010-14 graduates’ self-reported evaluations) revealed that graduates were very satisfied with the program’s effectiveness in facilitating ministry skill areas. Student credited the conference and cohort system for learning collaborative skills and some have used skills learned at EDS in field education and diocesan work.

Master of Arts (Theological Studies)

At EDS we expect that graduates with an MDiv degree should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of one special and one general field, and are capable of critical and creative thinking, and are competent in theological research and methodology.
  2. Develop interdisciplinary competence, cultural sensitivity, and know other religions and intercultural and cross-cultural competency, and are competent in dealing with issues of the local and the global.
  3. Address their vocational and professional goals, have an embodied competence concerning race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability, and are knowledgeable in regard to the ministry dimensions of their vocation.
  4. Become agents of transformation and change, and are able to uncover and facilitate subaltern perspectives.
  5. Demonstrate integrity in terms of professional ethics, self-care, and a balance of body, mind, and spirit.

Direct measures of learning (2013-14) revealed that 50% of the students exceeded the faculty’s standards for degree program goals, while 50% met the standards with some qualification. Indirect measures of learning (2013-14 graduates’ self-reported evaluations) show that students gained advanced knowledge in their chosen field of special competence and found the Foundation for Theological Praxis course (required for all Masters students) and interfaith and intercultural courses helpful in developing social analysis. Those who have written a thesis reported that they had developed advanced research skills and integrated their studies in the process. 

Doctor of Ministry

The DMin graduates from EDS should be able to: 

  1. Possess advanced knowledge of the nature and purposes of ministry in relation to their experience, and are able to generate new knowledge.  
  2. Develop collaborative processes and at the same time have self-knowledge and self-critical skills.
  3. Develop skills in writing, engage in advanced research, integration and analysis, use sophisticated interdisciplinary methodologies. 
  4. Develop a practice-oriented focus, that can ably balance practical, pastoral, and public theology, at both the local and global level. 
  5. Develop competence in ministerial skills and are knowledgeable of and able to facilitate discussions on embodied categories such as race, gender, class, sexuality, and ability.
  6. Become leaders for change, and are able to critique and transformation of people and institutions; engage tradition and yet uncover subaltern voices, and able to formulate a topic that will go beyond one’s own ministry to help others.
  7. Demonstrate an enhanced understanding of personal and professional ethic and continued spiritual growth.

We had a small number of graduates in 2014. Direct measures of learning (2013-14) revealed that 50% of students exceeded the faculty’s standards for degree program goals, while 50% met standards with some qualification. The theses showed that the students have learned to use interdisciplinary methods in their research.
Indirect measures of learning (2013-14 graduates’ self-reported evaluations) revealed that the DMin program achieved the program goals of helping students to develop advanced understanding of ministry, and writing the thesis honed students’ writing and analytical skills.