Course Listings

To learn how to register for these courses or for more information, please contact the registrar at registrar@eds.edu.

Fall 2013
Course ID
Course Name
Instructor(s)
W 1236.CR01 Lucretia Yaghjian

This six week mini-course reviews the basics of writing theological research by engaging students in the writing of a theological research project from its inception to its completion. The course may be taken in tandem with W2323, “Theological Library Research,” as a research writing tutorial, or as a free-standing course.  Students will choose an MA/MDiv thesis project or research paper assignment from one of their EDS classes to work on in conjunction with this course. They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic;  formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design a research-writing template that can be adapted to the requirements of the various research assignments encountered in graduate-level theological study. The course format includes PowerPoint presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian’s Writing Theology Well, writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

Dates: November 1, 8, 15, 22; December 6, 13

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Fri
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

This six week mini-course reviews the basics of writing theological research by engaging students in the writing of a theological research project from its inception to its completion. The course may be taken in tandem with W2323, “Theological Library Research,” as a research writing tutorial, or as a free-standing course.  Students will choose an MA/MDiv thesis project or research paper assignment from one of their EDS classes to work on in conjunction with this course. They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic;  formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design a research-writing template that can be adapted to the requirements of the various research assignments encountered in graduate-level theological study. The course format includes PowerPoint presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian’s Writing Theology Well, writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

Dates: November 1, 8, 15, 22; December 6, 13

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Fri
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
W 1235.CR01 Lucretia Yaghjian

This six week course provides an introduction to writing in a theological context, focusing on the standard theological genres of theological reflection, theological argument, the constructive theological essay in its various applications (church history, Christian ethics, pastoral studies) and biblical exegesis, including a biblical exegesis research workshop with EDS Senior Research Librarian Aura Fluet in conjunction with the course. Weekly theological memos will offer opportunities to experiment with these theological genres, and to integrate their requirements with the resonances of the student’s voice. Toward that end, students will choose a paper assigned for one of their EDS courses in one of these genres to be submitted concurrently for completion in this course. The course format will feature Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian’s Writing Theology Well, “hands-on” writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

Dates:  September 6, 13; October 4, 11, 18, 25 

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Fri
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

This six week course provides an introduction to writing in a theological context, focusing on the standard theological genres of theological reflection, theological argument, the constructive theological essay in its various applications (church history, Christian ethics, pastoral studies) and biblical exegesis, including a biblical exegesis research workshop with EDS Senior Research Librarian Aura Fluet in conjunction with the course. Weekly theological memos will offer opportunities to experiment with these theological genres, and to integrate their requirements with the resonances of the student’s voice. Toward that end, students will choose a paper assigned for one of their EDS courses in one of these genres to be submitted concurrently for completion in this course. The course format will feature Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian’s Writing Theology Well, “hands-on” writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

Dates:  September 6, 13; October 4, 11, 18, 25 

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Fri
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
L PT 2100 The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns, Ellen Oak

Employing a wide range of contemporary resources, as well as various historical studies, this course explores the theology and practice of daily prayer and its disciplines of praise, intercession, and scriptural and spiritual reading. Set firmly within an ecumenical context, the course particularly considers developments in the Anglican Communion since the Episcopal Church's Book of Common, 1979.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Tues
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Employing a wide range of contemporary resources, as well as various historical studies, this course explores the theology and practice of daily prayer and its disciplines of praise, intercession, and scriptural and spiritual reading. Set firmly within an ecumenical context, the course particularly considers developments in the Anglican Communion since the Episcopal Church's Book of Common, 1979.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Tues
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
HB 1030.CR01 Dr. Gale A. Yee

An introduction to the literature and theologies of the First Testament/Hebrew Bible, as well as to the history, society, cultures, and religions of ancient Israel in the context of the ancient Near East from the Exodus to the Exile.

Mondays 2-4pm, Thursday 3-4pm

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Thurs
Time:

An introduction to the literature and theologies of the First Testament/Hebrew Bible, as well as to the history, society, cultures, and religions of ancient Israel in the context of the ancient Near East from the Exodus to the Exile.

Mondays 2-4pm, Thursday 3-4pm

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Thurs
Time:
FTP 1010.CR01 The Rev. Canon Edward W. Rodman, Suzanne Ehly

“Foundations” is the Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the Church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors. 

Tuesdays, 10:00am-12:30pm: 9/17; 10/1; 10/29; 12/17. Plus 4 days ‘Visions’ in October, TBD. 
Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
Day(s):
Time:

“Foundations” is the Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the Church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors. 

Tuesdays, 10:00am-12:30pm: 9/17; 10/1; 10/29; 12/17. Plus 4 days ‘Visions’ in October, TBD. 
Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
Day(s):
Time:
T 2160.SC01 Dr. Kwok Pui Lan

A critical study of the challenges and the contributions of Third World feminist theology to the theological discipline. The works of Mercy AmbaOduyoye, Elsa Tamez, IvoneGebara, Chung Hyun Kyung, and Mary John Mananzan will be studied. G

Enrollment Note: This course is available for in class students as well as up to 12 students enrolled as online simulcast students.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Weds
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

A critical study of the challenges and the contributions of Third World feminist theology to the theological discipline. The works of Mercy AmbaOduyoye, Elsa Tamez, IvoneGebara, Chung Hyun Kyung, and Mary John Mananzan will be studied. G

Enrollment Note: This course is available for in class students as well as up to 12 students enrolled as online simulcast students.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Weds
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
NT 1530.CR01 Dr. Lawrence Wills

An exegesis course on John’s gospel, emphasizing the literary development of the gospel, the reconstruction of the author’s community, and its relation to Judaism.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

An exegesis course on John’s gospel, emphasizing the literary development of the gospel, the reconstruction of the author’s community, and its relation to Judaism.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
NT 1020.OL01 Dr. Gale A. Yee

An introduction to the literature of the New Testament in its historical, social, and theological context. Attention will be given to learning basic exegetical techniques.

Limited to 12 DL students. [EDS-DL students given priority; No TL, Commuters, or BTI students]

Online (Required Live Sessions: Thurs 7:00-9:00pm 9/5; 10/10; 11/7; 12/12)

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153 (Live Sessions)
Day(s): Online
Time:

An introduction to the literature of the New Testament in its historical, social, and theological context. Attention will be given to learning basic exegetical techniques.

Limited to 12 DL students. [EDS-DL students given priority; No TL, Commuters, or BTI students]

Online (Required Live Sessions: Thurs 7:00-9:00pm 9/5; 10/10; 11/7; 12/12)

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153 (Live Sessions)
Day(s): Online
Time:
PT 2020.SC01 The Rev. Dr. William Kondrath

How would a governing board function more efficiently and effectively if they paid attention to their feelings? How might newcomers’ ministry change if those responsible for welcoming and incorporating newcomers paid as much attention to the feelings of visitors as they did to what they were wearing? How might youth ministry change if we valued the feelings of young people as much as we honored their intellectual questions? Lay and clergy leaders are trained to be intellectually competent for ministerial leadership. In classrooms and internships, they learn practical, behavioral skills such as preaching and how to administer sacramental rites. This course equips leaders to be able to read and understand their own feelings and to increase the emotional or affective competence of committee members, religious educators, and all parishioners. The course will look at recent literature that examines the interplay of thinking and feeling. It will examine how individuals and groups learn not to express certain feelings to their detriment. It will offer strategies for becoming more affectively transparent.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Mon
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

How would a governing board function more efficiently and effectively if they paid attention to their feelings? How might newcomers’ ministry change if those responsible for welcoming and incorporating newcomers paid as much attention to the feelings of visitors as they did to what they were wearing? How might youth ministry change if we valued the feelings of young people as much as we honored their intellectual questions? Lay and clergy leaders are trained to be intellectually competent for ministerial leadership. In classrooms and internships, they learn practical, behavioral skills such as preaching and how to administer sacramental rites. This course equips leaders to be able to read and understand their own feelings and to increase the emotional or affective competence of committee members, religious educators, and all parishioners. The course will look at recent literature that examines the interplay of thinking and feeling. It will examine how individuals and groups learn not to express certain feelings to their detriment. It will offer strategies for becoming more affectively transparent.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Mon
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
E 1280.SC01 The Rev. Dr. Joan M. Martin

The focus on this course is the historical theological and ethical development of Anglican moral theology and contemporary concerns of The Episcopal Church. Foundational thinkers, methods, themes, and related aspects of the moral life will be outlined and students will participate in class presentations. This course serves as an introductory course for competence in the field.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Weds
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

The focus on this course is the historical theological and ethical development of Anglican moral theology and contemporary concerns of The Episcopal Church. Foundational thinkers, methods, themes, and related aspects of the moral life will be outlined and students will participate in class presentations. This course serves as an introductory course for competence in the field.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Weds
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
CH PT 2502.SC01 Dr. Fredrica Harris Thompsett

This survey course will give students a working knowledge of the history (histories), ethos, and cultures of The Episcopal Church including an appreciation of both the highlights and the challenges of Anglicanism in the United States. Included will be a study of the practice of The General Convention and an investigation into The Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church. The history and polity of The Episcopal Church will be placed within the context of the global Anglican Communion. The ability to apply insights as religious leaders to pastoral and missional contexts will guide the course.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Mon
Time: 9:15 am to 11:45 am

This survey course will give students a working knowledge of the history (histories), ethos, and cultures of The Episcopal Church including an appreciation of both the highlights and the challenges of Anglicanism in the United States. Included will be a study of the practice of The General Convention and an investigation into The Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church. The history and polity of The Episcopal Church will be placed within the context of the global Anglican Communion. The ability to apply insights as religious leaders to pastoral and missional contexts will guide the course.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online. Preference is given to EDS Final Year students. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Mon
Time: 9:15 am to 11:45 am
E T 1060.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Christopher Duraisingh, The Rev. Dr. Joan M. Martin

This course will begin by exploring the calling of the church to be a transformative agent in society. Such an exploration will be undertaken through a study of critical social theories and praxis in new social movements and their relationship to religion.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm

This course will begin by exploring the calling of the church to be a transformative agent in society. Such an exploration will be undertaken through a study of critical social theories and praxis in new social movements and their relationship to religion.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm
L 1234.CR01 Ellen Oak

Through preparing choral music for weekly Eucharist and special events, students will develop skills in musical presider ship; study church history and theology in diverse repertoire of sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the power of music and the arts in both personal and public spheres. (Limited to EDS students)

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Weds
Time: 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Through preparing choral music for weekly Eucharist and special events, students will develop skills in musical presider ship; study church history and theology in diverse repertoire of sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the power of music and the arts in both personal and public spheres. (Limited to EDS students)

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Weds
Time: 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
W 2323.CR01 Aura Fluet

The advent of the digital age has irrevocably changed the landscape of research but it has not fundamentally altered the complexity of the research process. In fact, it could be argued that while computer based research brings the libraries of the world to the desktop it is more difficult than ever to evaluate and synthesize the sheer wealth of information that is available. This course is an introduction to library research for students enrolled in master’s level and certificate degree programs in theological studies. Its practical aim is to introduce students to the online and print information resources, available through the Library and on the Web, which can be accessed in writing their research papers/projects. Through a process of inquiry, hands-on workshops, and guided by the research questions they have formulated, students create their own network of resources integrating new information into their knowledge base as they begin writing their research. This course is also designed to address the growing need of students to become conversant with emerging technologies, to become effective researchers as students and life-long learners.

Fridays, 2pm-4pm: November 1, 8, 15, 22; Dec. 6, 13 
Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s):
Time: 2:00 pm

The advent of the digital age has irrevocably changed the landscape of research but it has not fundamentally altered the complexity of the research process. In fact, it could be argued that while computer based research brings the libraries of the world to the desktop it is more difficult than ever to evaluate and synthesize the sheer wealth of information that is available. This course is an introduction to library research for students enrolled in master’s level and certificate degree programs in theological studies. Its practical aim is to introduce students to the online and print information resources, available through the Library and on the Web, which can be accessed in writing their research papers/projects. Through a process of inquiry, hands-on workshops, and guided by the research questions they have formulated, students create their own network of resources integrating new information into their knowledge base as they begin writing their research. This course is also designed to address the growing need of students to become conversant with emerging technologies, to become effective researchers as students and life-long learners.

Fridays, 2pm-4pm: November 1, 8, 15, 22; Dec. 6, 13 
Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s):
Time: 2:00 pm
January 2014
Course ID
Course Name
Instructor(s)
CS 4501.SE01 Katherine Stiles, Mpho Tutu
This will be a two week Pilgrimage to South Africa, (exact dates TBA) offered to EDS students for course credit. Leaders are The Rev. Katherine Stiles and The Rev. Mpho Tutu, who have co-facilitated pilgrimages to South Africa together for 10 years. The intention of this immersion course is formational and transformational. Space is limited. Registration may be made in June with the understanding that an application process is required and registration does not guarantee acceptance. Registration is open in June, 2013. Participation is limited to 11 students.  Students in degree programs will be given priority.
 
Application must be made by filling out the application form and submitting no later than September 8, 2013. Further details will be announced. This course is available through the generosity of a grant through the Defeitas Foundation.
Credits: 3.00 credits
Location:
Day(s):
Time:
This will be a two week Pilgrimage to South Africa, (exact dates TBA) offered to EDS students for course credit. Leaders are The Rev. Katherine Stiles and The Rev. Mpho Tutu, who have co-facilitated pilgrimages to South Africa together for 10 years. The intention of this immersion course is formational and transformational. Space is limited. Registration may be made in June with the understanding that an application process is required and registration does not guarantee acceptance. Registration is open in June, 2013. Participation is limited to 11 students.  Students in degree programs will be given priority.
 
Application must be made by filling out the application form and submitting no later than September 8, 2013. Further details will be announced. This course is available through the generosity of a grant through the Defeitas Foundation.
Credits: 3.00 credits
Location:
Day(s):
Time:
L 2010.CR01 Miriam Gelfer, Ellen Oak

Course runs Week 1 of term. 

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm

Course runs Week 1 of term. 

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm
T CS 1922.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Christopher Duraisingh

Through selected texts, guest lecturers from different faith-traditions, and case studies, this course will attempt at an analysis of both the rich resources and the formidable obstacles in five of the major world religions for building communities of just peace. As human communities everywhere continue to be torn apart by ethnic violence, racial conflicts, gender, hetero-sexist and other forms of injustices, it is an imperative for theological communities to examine the religious factors that exacerbate injustices and forms of hatred, and explore how religious traditions have inspired justice, peace and human flourishing. Attention will be paid to the possibilities of inter-faith co-operation and the consequent re-visioning of the symbolic, ritual/liturgical, and conceptual practices across religious traditions for joint-action in subverting hatred and building justice and peace. Underlying the course is the conviction that there can be "no peace among the nations without peace among the religions. No peace among religions without dialogue between the religions." --Hans Küng.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm

Through selected texts, guest lecturers from different faith-traditions, and case studies, this course will attempt at an analysis of both the rich resources and the formidable obstacles in five of the major world religions for building communities of just peace. As human communities everywhere continue to be torn apart by ethnic violence, racial conflicts, gender, hetero-sexist and other forms of injustices, it is an imperative for theological communities to examine the religious factors that exacerbate injustices and forms of hatred, and explore how religious traditions have inspired justice, peace and human flourishing. Attention will be paid to the possibilities of inter-faith co-operation and the consequent re-visioning of the symbolic, ritual/liturgical, and conceptual practices across religious traditions for joint-action in subverting hatred and building justice and peace. Underlying the course is the conviction that there can be "no peace among the nations without peace among the religions. No peace among religions without dialogue between the religions." --Hans Küng.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm
HB NT 2200.CR01 Dr. Lawrence Wills

About half of the Bible is made up of stories, especially if we consider “history” as a kind of national story: primeval history, the kings and prophets of Israel, the exile and restoration, the Maccabees and the establishment of an independent Judah, the gospel accounts of Jesus, and the life and times of Peter and Paul in Acts. Here we will add to these some of the early Christian “apocryphal Acts,” which told the stories of the disciples in exciting and entertaining ways. This course operates on (at least) two levels: the exploration of the stories in their original context—to the extent that that can be rediscovered—and a discussion of the adaptation of these stories to the institution histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

About half of the Bible is made up of stories, especially if we consider “history” as a kind of national story: primeval history, the kings and prophets of Israel, the exile and restoration, the Maccabees and the establishment of an independent Judah, the gospel accounts of Jesus, and the life and times of Peter and Paul in Acts. Here we will add to these some of the early Christian “apocryphal Acts,” which told the stories of the disciples in exciting and entertaining ways. This course operates on (at least) two levels: the exploration of the stories in their original context—to the extent that that can be rediscovered—and a discussion of the adaptation of these stories to the institution histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
HB 1110.CR01 Dr. Angela Bauer-Levesque

Taking into account the social locations of the reader(s) as well as the texts, this course enters the worlds of Isaiah of Jerusalem as well as the Isaianic poet-prophet of the Exile and after through exegetical study of the Isaianic corpus. Special attention will be given to lectionary passages and to theological issues related to preaching from the Book of Isaiah (one week only, January 6-10, 2014). 

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

Taking into account the social locations of the reader(s) as well as the texts, this course enters the worlds of Isaiah of Jerusalem as well as the Isaianic poet-prophet of the Exile and after through exegetical study of the Isaianic corpus. Special attention will be given to lectionary passages and to theological issues related to preaching from the Book of Isaiah (one week only, January 6-10, 2014). 

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
L 2240.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns

This seminar examines the development of Eucharist and Baptism with special attention to the question of their relationship to each other and how that relationship affects the practice of baptismal preparation and the reception of communion. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

This seminar examines the development of Eucharist and Baptism with special attention to the question of their relationship to each other and how that relationship affects the practice of baptismal preparation and the reception of communion. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
PT 1160.CR01 Dr. Fredrica Harris Thompsett

A course designed to strengthen ability and confidence to preach compassion and justice in diverse communities. It will include: readings from African Americans as well as other voices and contexts, discussion of prophetic challenges, student preaching of at least two sermons, and a variety of homiletic resources.

Limited to 12 students

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:15 am to 11:45 pm

A course designed to strengthen ability and confidence to preach compassion and justice in diverse communities. It will include: readings from African Americans as well as other voices and contexts, discussion of prophetic challenges, student preaching of at least two sermons, and a variety of homiletic resources.

Limited to 12 students

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:15 am to 11:45 pm
PT L 1420.CR01 Suzanne Ehly

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts. Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:15 am to 11:45 am

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts. Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Tyler Room, Burnham Hall
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:15 am to 11:45 am
DMin 3000.CR01 Dr. Kwok Pui Lan

This course will assist the DMin students to produce the DMin thesis project proposal and develop skills in research, writing, and preparing the thesis project. 

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 12:00 pm

This course will assist the DMin students to produce the DMin thesis project proposal and develop skills in research, writing, and preparing the thesis project. 

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 12:00 pm
Spring 2014
Course ID
Course Name
Instructor(s)
W 1235.OL01 Lucretia Yaghjian

This six week course provides an introduction to writing in a theological context, focusing on the standard theological genres of theological reflection, theological argument, the constructive theological essay in its various applications (church history, Christian ethics, pastoral studies) and biblical exegesis, including a biblical exegesis research workshop with EDS Senior Research Librarian Aura Fluet in conjunction with the course. Weekly theological memos will offer opportunities to experiment with these theological genres, and to integrate their requirements with the resonances of the student’s voice. Toward that end, students will choose a paper assigned for one of their EDS courses in one of these genres to be submitted concurrently for completion in this course. The course format will feature Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian’s Writing Theology Well, “hands-on” writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

Tentative Dates: 1/27/14 - 3/10/14

Enrollment Note: Limited to DL and Commuter Students.

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location:
Day(s): Online
Time:

This six week course provides an introduction to writing in a theological context, focusing on the standard theological genres of theological reflection, theological argument, the constructive theological essay in its various applications (church history, Christian ethics, pastoral studies) and biblical exegesis, including a biblical exegesis research workshop with EDS Senior Research Librarian Aura Fluet in conjunction with the course. Weekly theological memos will offer opportunities to experiment with these theological genres, and to integrate their requirements with the resonances of the student’s voice. Toward that end, students will choose a paper assigned for one of their EDS courses in one of these genres to be submitted concurrently for completion in this course. The course format will feature Power Point presentations based on Lucretia Yaghjian’s Writing Theology Well, “hands-on” writing workshops, and writing consultation sessions with the instructor.

Tentative Dates: 1/27/14 - 3/10/14

Enrollment Note: Limited to DL and Commuter Students.

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location:
Day(s): Online
Time:
W 1236.OL01 Lucretia Yaghjian

This mini-course adapts the WRITE course (WR 1236) to an online environment, with a focus on writing the theological thesis well. The course is being offered out of the conviction that writing a theological thesis is both a personal labor of love and a public academic performance, requiring the successful integration of one’s writing voice and research methodology into a well-crafted argumentative essay, documented and formatted according to appropriate academic conventions.  Toward that end, course participants will review the basics of writing theological research by writing their own MA, MDiv, or D.Min. thesis projects (or parts thereof).  They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic; formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design research-writing templates adapted to the requirements of their thesis projects.

Tentative Dates: 3/17/14 - 5/12/14

Enrollment Note: Limited to DL and Commuter Students.

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location:
Day(s): Online
Time:

This mini-course adapts the WRITE course (WR 1236) to an online environment, with a focus on writing the theological thesis well. The course is being offered out of the conviction that writing a theological thesis is both a personal labor of love and a public academic performance, requiring the successful integration of one’s writing voice and research methodology into a well-crafted argumentative essay, documented and formatted according to appropriate academic conventions.  Toward that end, course participants will review the basics of writing theological research by writing their own MA, MDiv, or D.Min. thesis projects (or parts thereof).  They will learn how to generate a research question; identify a research methodology appropriate to their project; review relevant literature related to their topic; formulate a research thesis; develop an extended research argument; navigate the conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, and citing research sources in footnotes and bibliography; and design research-writing templates adapted to the requirements of their thesis projects.

Tentative Dates: 3/17/14 - 5/12/14

Enrollment Note: Limited to DL and Commuter Students.

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location:
Day(s): Online
Time:
CS HB NT 2640.SC01 Celene Lizzio
This course surveys Christian and Muslim depictions of prophets and prominent figures that appear within the Bible and the Qur'an, including, but not limited to, Adam, Eve, Moses, Joseph, Abraham, John, Mary, and Jesus. Course readings are focused on the scriptural narratives themselves with some attention given to commentary traditions and secondary scholarship within the field of comparative theology. Students are encouraged to employ comparative lenses to explore subsequent popular, artistic, and literary representations. No previous background in Qur’anic studies is required.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
This course surveys Christian and Muslim depictions of prophets and prominent figures that appear within the Bible and the Qur'an, including, but not limited to, Adam, Eve, Moses, Joseph, Abraham, John, Mary, and Jesus. Course readings are focused on the scriptural narratives themselves with some attention given to commentary traditions and secondary scholarship within the field of comparative theology. Students are encouraged to employ comparative lenses to explore subsequent popular, artistic, and literary representations. No previous background in Qur’anic studies is required.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
PT 2460.CR01 Cathy George

This course will explore the theology and practice of pastoral ministry. It will provide a foundation for appropriate and effective pastoral care for leaders seeking to offer compassion, hope and transformation. Readings, discussion, weekly writing assignments and a final paper will provide students with an opportunity to explore the elements of pastoral theology in preaching and sacramental ministry, prayer and its disciplines, and the vocation call of all Christians.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

This course will explore the theology and practice of pastoral ministry. It will provide a foundation for appropriate and effective pastoral care for leaders seeking to offer compassion, hope and transformation. Readings, discussion, weekly writing assignments and a final paper will provide students with an opportunity to explore the elements of pastoral theology in preaching and sacramental ministry, prayer and its disciplines, and the vocation call of all Christians.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 153
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
HB 2104.CR01 Dr. Gale A. Yee

An investigation of ancient Israelite women vis-à-vis women in the Hebrew Bible. Such figures as Eve, the matriarchs, Judith, Ruth, Esther, and Susanna, as well as metaphors of women as “evil,” will be considered critically from social, literary, and cultural perspectives, focusing on the construction and representation of gender in the biblical text and in the culture.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

An investigation of ancient Israelite women vis-à-vis women in the Hebrew Bible. Such figures as Eve, the matriarchs, Judith, Ruth, Esther, and Susanna, as well as metaphors of women as “evil,” will be considered critically from social, literary, and cultural perspectives, focusing on the construction and representation of gender in the biblical text and in the culture.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
PT L 1420.CR01 Suzanne Ehly

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts.

Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis

Time: Friday 6pm-9pm, Saturdays 9am-4pm; 2/7-2/8; 3/21-3/22; 4/25-26

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Burnham Hall Tyler Room
Day(s): Fri, Sat
Time:

A course for the courageous, who wish to explore first-hand the liberatory and transformative power of their voices in community. Using the classroom community as a laboratory, the course will combine (1) practical work on voice production and the body/mind/soul as human instrument with (2) in-class discussion and small team exploration of readings on voice, identity/community membership and leadership. Voice work will include group exercises for freeing the body and voice, as well as individual work in front of the group using prepared spoken texts and/or sung pieces. Readings will be drawn from writings on the physical voice and voice as an element of social location from womanist, feminist, anti-white supremacist and other anti-oppression perspectives. Participants will engage questions of voice and power in pastoral, liturgical, theological, educational and spiritual contexts.

Limited to 12 students. No auditors. Students will attend all sessions, even if registering for the two credit option.

Prerequisite: FTP 1010: Foundations for Theological Praxis

Time: Friday 6pm-9pm, Saturdays 9am-4pm; 2/7-2/8; 3/21-3/22; 4/25-26

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Burnham Hall Tyler Room
Day(s): Fri, Sat
Time:
L 1040.CR01 Jeff Mello

This workshop encompasses the nuts and bolts of enacting the various liturgies of the church. Training for practical worship and musical leadership is affected through confronting the structure and meaning of the rites as enacted and by expanding students' facility for leading worship by means of vocal and movement exercises.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

This workshop encompasses the nuts and bolts of enacting the various liturgies of the church. Training for practical worship and musical leadership is affected through confronting the structure and meaning of the rites as enacted and by expanding students' facility for leading worship by means of vocal and movement exercises.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
L 3020.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns

A critical exploration of intersections between a cluster of contemporary theologies—for example feminist, queer, and postcolonial, “child theology”—and liturgical theology and practice.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

A critical exploration of intersections between a cluster of contemporary theologies—for example feminist, queer, and postcolonial, “child theology”—and liturgical theology and practice.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
T 1990.CR01 Dr. Kwok Pui Lan

What does Christian theology have to say to the present ecological crisis? This course introduces discussions on the relation between God and creation in biblical, classical, and contemporary theological texts. Students will explore different doctrines of God and formulate their ideas on cosmology, humanity, salvation, and the work of the spirit.

 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Weds
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

What does Christian theology have to say to the present ecological crisis? This course introduces discussions on the relation between God and creation in biblical, classical, and contemporary theological texts. Students will explore different doctrines of God and formulate their ideas on cosmology, humanity, salvation, and the work of the spirit.

 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Weds
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
CS PT 2019.CR01 The Rev. Canon Edward W. Rodman

This course will examine the new challenges confronting the Church in social ministry. Particular emphasis will be placed on institutional responses to the environmental crisis, health care delivery, housing for all people, and a close examination of the criminal justice system. The premise of the course involves the recognition that the word urban has become a code for race and as such the course will examine racism as a personal and institutional impediment to positively engaging all social issues. We will review previous strategies, evaluate their effectiveness and utility for the 21st century, and seek clarity regarding the appropriate roles for the Church, for the government, and the private sector as each seeks to respond to the crisis that our cultures faces in these areas. G

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall
Day(s): Tues
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm

This course will examine the new challenges confronting the Church in social ministry. Particular emphasis will be placed on institutional responses to the environmental crisis, health care delivery, housing for all people, and a close examination of the criminal justice system. The premise of the course involves the recognition that the word urban has become a code for race and as such the course will examine racism as a personal and institutional impediment to positively engaging all social issues. We will review previous strategies, evaluate their effectiveness and utility for the 21st century, and seek clarity regarding the appropriate roles for the Church, for the government, and the private sector as each seeks to respond to the crisis that our cultures faces in these areas. G

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall
Day(s): Tues
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm
E T 2600.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Joan M. Martin

Womanist Ethics explores the experience of African American women from slavery to the present as a valuable and valid subject for Christian ethics. The course focuses on several themes that elucidate many of the sources, methods, and content that womanist use in the analysis of the black religious tradition, race, gender, class, and sexuality. The class is taught in seminar style, inclusive lectures, student-led group discussion, art, and music. 

Time: Friday 6:00pm to 9:00pm, Saturday 9:00am to 4:00pm; 1/31-2/1; 2/28-3/1; 4/11-4/12

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Fri, Sat, Weekend Class
Time:

Womanist Ethics explores the experience of African American women from slavery to the present as a valuable and valid subject for Christian ethics. The course focuses on several themes that elucidate many of the sources, methods, and content that womanist use in the analysis of the black religious tradition, race, gender, class, and sexuality. The class is taught in seminar style, inclusive lectures, student-led group discussion, art, and music. 

Time: Friday 6:00pm to 9:00pm, Saturday 9:00am to 4:00pm; 1/31-2/1; 2/28-3/1; 4/11-4/12

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Fri, Sat, Weekend Class
Time:
T 1025. SC01 The Rev. Dr. Patrick S. Cheng

This course is an introduction to the sources, methods, and major doctrines of Christian theology. Topics to be covered include revelation, the persons and functions of the Trinity, sin and grace, the church and sacraments, missiology, and last things. Particular attention will be paid to the historical development as well as the contemporary reconstructions of such doctrines.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Weds
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

This course is an introduction to the sources, methods, and major doctrines of Christian theology. Topics to be covered include revelation, the persons and functions of the Trinity, sin and grace, the church and sacraments, missiology, and last things. Particular attention will be paid to the historical development as well as the contemporary reconstructions of such doctrines.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Weds
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
PT 2060.CR01 Liz Magill

Those of us called to serve parishes will most likely start in a church that feels 'not yet big enough' to support the ministry we've dreamed of.Most congregations in the United States have less than 75 in attendance. We will start with the ecclesiology question: what is church? and then explore how to help congregations answer the question 'what is this church?". We will look at finding effective ministry in yoked and shared ministries, cooperative ministries, very small churches, new churches, and dying churches. In each case we will explore what leadership roles are called for, and how to continue to be ministers to the world in these contexts.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Those of us called to serve parishes will most likely start in a church that feels 'not yet big enough' to support the ministry we've dreamed of.Most congregations in the United States have less than 75 in attendance. We will start with the ecclesiology question: what is church? and then explore how to help congregations answer the question 'what is this church?". We will look at finding effective ministry in yoked and shared ministries, cooperative ministries, very small churches, new churches, and dying churches. In each case we will explore what leadership roles are called for, and how to continue to be ministers to the world in these contexts.

Enrollment Note: Limited to 15 in-seat and 10 online.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 155
Day(s): Thurs
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
L 1234.CR01 Ellen Oak

Through preparing choral music for weekly Eucharist and special events, students will develop skills in musical presider ship; study church history and theology in diverse repertoire of sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the power of music and the arts in both personal and public spheres. (Limited to EDS students)

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Weds
Time: 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Through preparing choral music for weekly Eucharist and special events, students will develop skills in musical presider ship; study church history and theology in diverse repertoire of sung prayer; and deepen their understanding of the power of music and the arts in both personal and public spheres. (Limited to EDS students)

Credits: 1.00 credits
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Weds
Time: 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
June 2014
Course ID
Course Name
Instructor(s)
L1040.CR01 The Very Rev. Katherine Hancock RagsdaleThe Rev. Cn. Mally Lloyd

This workshop encompasses the nuts and bolts of enacting the various liturgies of the church. Training for practical worship and musical leadership is affected through confronting the structure and meaning of the rites as enacted and by expanding students' facility for leading worship by means of vocal and movement exercises.

Credits:
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

This workshop encompasses the nuts and bolts of enacting the various liturgies of the church. Training for practical worship and musical leadership is affected through confronting the structure and meaning of the rites as enacted and by expanding students' facility for leading worship by means of vocal and movement exercises.

Credits:
Location: St. John's Memorial Chapel
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
PT CS 2200.CR01 Sheryl Kujawa-Holbrook

Studies show that less than 3 percent of American congregations are fully multicultural. Neither progressive nor conservative theological stances alone determine the level of pluralism reached. This course will focus on the dynamics of liberation and oppression as they are lived out within the context of faith communities and religious organizations. Grounded in the theory of interlocking oppressions, the course understands race as a key variable in the history and organization of American religions, and therefore integral to understandings of theologies, ecclesiologies, and ministry. Through a mix of theory and practical application, and skill-building, students will also have an opportunity to look at the ways other social identities and interreligious encounters shape congregational life.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Studies show that less than 3 percent of American congregations are fully multicultural. Neither progressive nor conservative theological stances alone determine the level of pluralism reached. This course will focus on the dynamics of liberation and oppression as they are lived out within the context of faith communities and religious organizations. Grounded in the theory of interlocking oppressions, the course understands race as a key variable in the history and organization of American religions, and therefore integral to understandings of theologies, ecclesiologies, and ministry. Through a mix of theory and practical application, and skill-building, students will also have an opportunity to look at the ways other social identities and interreligious encounters shape congregational life.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall, Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
HB 1717.CR01 Dr. Gale A. Yee

This course examines the corpus of books known as Deuteronomistic History, in which some of the most colorful individuals in the Bible can be found. The books deal with ancient Israel's settlement in Canaan, its rise, decline, and eventual fall. We will examine the various dynamics involved in recording this "history," and how these voices are related to shifts in political power that require religious legitimacy. Special attention will be given to the exegesis of texts, using historical, sociological, and literary critical methodologies.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

This course examines the corpus of books known as Deuteronomistic History, in which some of the most colorful individuals in the Bible can be found. The books deal with ancient Israel's settlement in Canaan, its rise, decline, and eventual fall. We will examine the various dynamics involved in recording this "history," and how these voices are related to shifts in political power that require religious legitimacy. Special attention will be given to the exegesis of texts, using historical, sociological, and literary critical methodologies.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 155
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
T CS 2800.CR01 Dr. Kwok Pui Lan

This course explores different dimensions of a holistic and passionate spirituality for the modern world. The contribution of eco-conscious theologians, feminist religious writers, and Asian religions will be studied and the relationship between spirituality and the body, human desire, poverty, ecology, and power will be clarified. A particular focus of this course will be on how to lead a discussion group on spirituality in churches, schools, and the workplace. G

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

This course explores different dimensions of a holistic and passionate spirituality for the modern world. The contribution of eco-conscious theologians, feminist religious writers, and Asian religions will be studied and the relationship between spirituality and the body, human desire, poverty, ecology, and power will be clarified. A particular focus of this course will be on how to lead a discussion group on spirituality in churches, schools, and the workplace. G

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
FTP 1010.CR01 The Rev. Canon Edward W. Rodman, et al

“Foundations” is the Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the Church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors. 

Course Runs Week 1 of June session; Tuesday through Friday 9:30am to 4:30pm and Sunday 1:00pm to 9:00pm; Week 2 of June session; Monday through Friday 2:00pm to 4:30pm.

Credits: 4.00 credits
Location: Burnham Hall Tyler Room
Day(s): Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 4:30 pm

“Foundations” is the Episcopal Divinity School’s way of introducing incoming master’s program students to the understandings and commitments underlying the school’s purpose statement “to form leaders of hope, courage, and vision” who “serve and advance God’s mission of justice, compassion, and reconciliation.” Students will consider vocation both as the call to personal transformation and to act as God's agents of change and liberation in the world. Analysis will consider personal, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural power dynamics and will focus on race and racism as it informs our understanding of other forms of oppression. Through experiential learning, class presentations, and assignments, students will reflect on how their own social location shapes their actions and thinking while developing tools for theological reflection, social analysis, and engagement in the struggle for the renewal of the Church and the world.

Limited to EDS masters students and required of first-semester MDiv and MATS candidates. Occasionally non-masters students may enroll with permission of the instructors. 

Course Runs Week 1 of June session; Tuesday through Friday 9:30am to 4:30pm and Sunday 1:00pm to 9:00pm; Week 2 of June session; Monday through Friday 2:00pm to 4:30pm.

Credits: 4.00 credits
Location: Burnham Hall Tyler Room
Day(s): Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
E T 2271.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Joan M. Martin

There are many related questions currently about the nature of work in the 21st century-the meaning of vocation as a Christian in the church and workplace, the changing nature of work in the global economy, and ethical issues arising between faith and workplace life. Through lecture, discussion, and projects, this course will examine these questions as they affect the individual, ministry in the church, and the church's witness in society.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm

There are many related questions currently about the nature of work in the 21st century-the meaning of vocation as a Christian in the church and workplace, the changing nature of work in the global economy, and ethical issues arising between faith and workplace life. Through lecture, discussion, and projects, this course will examine these questions as they affect the individual, ministry in the church, and the church's witness in society.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm
T 2010.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Patrick S. Cheng

Who is Jesus Christ for us today? This course will explore a number of contextual christologies, including the Black Christ, the feminist Christ, the womanist Christ, the Asian Christ, the Asian feminist Christ, the Latina Christ, the queer Christ, and the disabled Christ. This course will also explore the intersections of postcolonial and queer theory with contemporary christological reflection. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

Who is Jesus Christ for us today? This course will explore a number of contextual christologies, including the Black Christ, the feminist Christ, the womanist Christ, the Asian Christ, the Asian feminist Christ, the Latina Christ, the queer Christ, and the disabled Christ. This course will also explore the intersections of postcolonial and queer theory with contemporary christological reflection. 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
T L 3030.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Stephen Burns

This course will explore a range of feminist critique and construction of Marian doctrine and its contribution to contemporary theology and ministry. 

 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm

This course will explore a range of feminist critique and construction of Marian doctrine and its contribution to contemporary theology and ministry. 

 

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 250
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 4:10 pm to 6:00 pm
PT 2120.CR01 David Vryhof

Those whose work it is (or will be) to help form the spiritual lives of others will find this course particularly useful. The course will introduce several methods of meditative prayer, discuss how these methods might be taught and modeled in classes, workshops, prayer groups and retreats. 

Open first to EDS students and alumni/ae; other students space permitting.

Runs Week 2 of June session.

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am

Those whose work it is (or will be) to help form the spiritual lives of others will find this course particularly useful. The course will introduce several methods of meditative prayer, discuss how these methods might be taught and modeled in classes, workshops, prayer groups and retreats. 

Open first to EDS students and alumni/ae; other students space permitting.

Runs Week 2 of June session.

Credits: 2.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 11:30 am
DMin 1000.CR01 The Rev. Dr. Joan M. Martin

An introduction to the DMin program, including: the history of the EDS DMin program, degree program process, and program formation. In the colloquium, participants discuss their ministerial contexts, future ministerial direction, and a projected program of courses that leads to a thesis proposal and project.

Runs Week 2 of June session.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

An introduction to the DMin program, including: the history of the EDS DMin program, degree program process, and program formation. In the colloquium, participants discuss their ministerial contexts, future ministerial direction, and a projected program of courses that leads to a thesis proposal and project.

Runs Week 2 of June session.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Sherrill Hall Room 153
Day(s): Mon, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
DMin 2000.CR01 The Rev. Canon Edward W. Rodman, et al

This course introduces DMin students to the personal, interpersonal, cultural, and institutional dimensions of antiracism work. Students will explore how this work relates to their ministry and thesis project. 

Runs Week 1 of June session.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Burnham Hall Tyler Room
Day(s): Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 4:30 pm

This course introduces DMin students to the personal, interpersonal, cultural, and institutional dimensions of antiracism work. Students will explore how this work relates to their ministry and thesis project. 

Runs Week 1 of June session.

Credits: 3.00 credits
Location: Burnham Hall Tyler Room
Day(s): Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri
Time: 9:30 am to 4:30 pm